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I need to reference something in APA 7

APA referencing examples

In this section, you will find examples of how to reference the resources most used in writing at university.

Take a look at the 'Quick guide to referencing'.  This is an introduction to the basic principles of APA 7 style of referencing.  

For more examples see the guides below: 

From September 2021 Hallam Library is supporting APA 7, as many courses and programmes  delivered at Sheffield Hallam recommend this referencing style.   A short video for returning students is available here covering the main changes you may encounter when using APA 7.  In some subject areas, students are asked to use other referencing styles that are appropriate for professional practice.  Please check what referencing style is expected for your programme of study. 

If you are a continuing student and need to reference something using APA 6 use our guide to APA 6.

Book: Print

Reference format:

Author(s). (Year of publication). Title. (Nth ed. if second edition or later). Publisher. 


Reference examples:

De Waal, K. (2017). My name is Leon. Penguin Books. 

Bolton, W. (2021). Instrumentation and control systems (3rd ed). Elsevier.


Citation examples:

(De Waal, 2017)  or   De Waal (2017) 

(Bolton, 2021)  or  Bolton (2021)


Note.

Only include edition information for second and later editions. Book references without edition information are assumed to be first editions.

Book: Electronic

Reference format:

Last name, Initial (s)., (Year). Title of book  (Nth ed. if second edition or later). Publisher. https://doi.org/xxxxx   If no DOI is available use a URL.


Reference examples:

Cassell, C., Cunliffe, A. L., & Grandy, G. (Eds.). (2018). The SAGE handbook of qualitative business and management research methods. Sage. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781526430212

Abram, C., & Karasavas, A. (2018). Facebook for dummies (7th ed). Wiley. https://learning.oreilly.com/library/view/facebook-for-dummies/9781119453864/cover.xhtml


Citation examples:

(Cassell et al., 2018) or Cassell et al. (2018)

(Abram & Karasavas, 2018) or Abram and Karasavas, 2018


Notes.

Only include edition information for second and later editions.   Book references without edition information are assumed to be first editions.

DOIs are Digital Object Identifiers.   Unlike web addresses, they identify content that can be accessed through different services so are preferred to web addresses.

Chapter from an edited book

Reference format:

Author(s) of chapter. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. In Editor(s) of book (Eds.) Title of book (Nth ed. if second edition or later) (pp. Page numbers). Publisher. DOI or URL if DOI not available- only if eBook


Reference examples:

Sabri, Y. (2021). Humanitarian logistics and supply chain management. In Sweeney, E. & Waters, D. (Eds.) Global logistics: new directions in supply chain management (8th ed., pp. 338-357). Kogan Page.

Rees, W. (2018). Planning in the Anthropocene. In Gunder, M., Madanipour, A., & Watson, V. (Eds.) The Routledge Handbook of Planning Theory (pp. 53-66). Routledge. https://doi.org.hallam.idm.oclc.org/10.4324/9781315696072


Citation examples:

(Cassell et al., 2018) or Cassell et al. (2018)

(Abram & Karasavas, 2018) or Abram and Karasavas (2018)


Notes.

Only include edition information for second and later editions.   Book references without edition information are assumed to be first editions.

DOIs are Digital Object Identifiers.   Unlike web addresses they identify content that can be accessed through different services so are preferred to web addresses.

Journal Article

Reference format:

Author(s). (Year). Title of the article. Name of Journal, volume number (Issue number), page-page. https://doi.org/xxxxx   If no DOI is available use a URL. for online articles


Reference examples:

Strangfeld, J. A. (2019). I just don’t want to be judged: Cultural capital’s impact on student plagiarism. SAGE Open, 9(1), 1-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/2158244018822382

Vezzani, V., & Gonzaga, S. (2017). Design for social sustainability: An educational approach for insular communities. The Design Journal, 20(1), 937-951. https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1353038


Citation examples:

(Strangfeld, 2019) or Strangfeld 2019

(Vezzani & Gonzaga, 2017) or Vezzani and Gonzaga (2017)


Notes.

DOIs are Digital Object Identifiers.   Unlike web addresses they identify content that can be accessed through different services so are preferred to web addresses.

Official report or publication

Reference format:

Author(s). (Year of publication). Title. (Report series and/or report number). Publisher. DOI or URL if online


Reference examples

Dacre, J., Woodhams, C., Atkinson, C., Laliotis, I., Williams, M., Blanden, J., Wild, S. & Brown, D. (2020).  Mend the gap: the independent review in gender pay gaps in medicine in England. Department of Health and Social Care. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/independent-review-into-gender-pay-gaps-in-medicine-in-england


Citation examples:

Dacre et al. (2020) or (Dacre et al., 2020)


Notes.

Citations usually only include the lead author if there are three or more authors.

DOIs are Digital Object Identifiers.   Unlike web addresses they identify content that can be accessed through different services so are preferred to web addresses.

Secondary reference: a citation in something you have read

When you want to use information or ideas that you have seen cited in something you have read, the best thing is to find the original source and read it for yourself. But sometimes this is not possible, or what you want to write about is the way that someone has used another source. In which case you should use secondary referencing making it clear that the ideas come from a secondary source rather than where they were originally published. 


Reference format:

Reference only what you have read (the source where you saw the citation).  Follow the format for a journal article, book etc. as appropriate. 


Reference examples:

These are the sources for the example citations below

Hollinger, K. (2012). Feminist film studies. Routledge.  

Robson, C. & McKartan, K. (2016). Real world research:  a resource for users of social research methods in applied settings (4th ed.). Wiley.


Citation format:

(original author, publication year of original source, as cited in secondary author, publication year of secondary source). 

Citation examples:

(Neale, 2000, as cited in Hollinger, 2012) or
Neale (2000, as cited in Hollinger, 2012)

(Anastas, 1999, as cited in Robson & McKartan, 2016, p148) or
Anastas (1999, as cited in Robson & McKartan, 2016, p148)


Notes.

If the date of the original source is unknown then omit the date.

If your citation is a quote use the page numbers for the source in your reference list, not the original page numbers.

Webpage

Reference format:

Author(s) / organisation name. (Year of publication, month day) Title of webpage. Website name. Retrieved month day, year, - if year of publication not available URL.


Reference examples:

World Health Organization (2020, May 30).  Youth advocate in Kenya’s tobacco control drive.  https://www.afro.who.int/news/youth-advocate-kenyas-tobacco-control-drive

Civil Society Unit. (n.d.).  History of cooperation between DPI and the NGO community.  United Nations. Retrieved July 7, 2021, from https://www.un.org/en/civil-society/page/history-cooperation-between-dpi-and-ngo-community


Citation examples:

(World Health Organization, 2020) or World Health Organization (2020)

(Civil Society Unit, n.d.) or Civil Society Unit (n.d.)


Notes.

  • Reference the individual page or pages which you have used.
  • For the date, use the published or last updated date of the page.  If there is no published or last updated date on the page use the copyright or last update date of the site.  If no day or month is given use the year only.
  • If no date can be found use (n.d.) and include  Retrieved Month Day, Year, from before the web address.
  • If a web page does not have an author, use the author of the web site.  The site author could be an individual but is more commonly a company, institution, or organisation.
  • If the author is the same as the website name do not repeat it after the title of the webpage.